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Gluten and Celiac Disease

More and more people are sensitive to gluten and wheat. We have not changed in the last 50 years but the wheat we eat has. An excellent article at the WSJ here.

Modern wheat varieties have short stems, the result of RHt dwarfing genes that reduce the plant’s sensitivity to gibberellic acid, a plant hormone that lengthens cells. RHt genes were introduced to modern wheat varieties in the 1960s by Norman Borlaug from Norin 10 cultivars of wheat grown in Japan. Short stems are important because the application of high levels of chemical fertilizers would otherwise cause the stems to grow too high, resulting in lodging (collapse of the stems). Stem heights are also even, which is important for modern harvesting techniques.

If you wish to take control of your health, giving up grains is a key element. Many of us who come from heritages that have a long association with wheat have been able to tolerate it until middle age. BUT it now looks like even this period of tolerance is being reduced – for 90% of the wheat today is the novel variety from the 1960’s .

Better than going Gluten free – give up grains.

Vitamin D – The struggle

There remains a battle going on about what is the best dose – though now little debate about how important having enough D is.

Here in full is the Statement of the Vitamin D Council

Caucasian skin produces approximately 10,000 IU vitamin D in response to 20–30 minutes summer sun exposure. This is over 16 times higher than the US government’s recommendation of 600 IU per day!

This high rate of natural production of vitamin D3 cholecalciferol(pronounced koh·luh·kal·sif·uh·rawl) in the skin is the single most important fact every person should know about vitamin D—a fact that has profound implications for the natural human condition.

Technically not a “vitamin,” vitamin D is in a class by itself. Its metabolic product, calcitriol, is actually a secosteroid hormone that is the key that unlocks binding sites on the human genome. The human genome contains more than 2,700 binding sites for calcitriol; those binding sites are near genes involved in virtually every known major disease of humans.

Current research has implicated vitamin D deficiency as a major factor in the pathology of at least 17 varieties of cancer as well as heart disease, stroke, hypertension, autoimmune diseases, diabetes, depression, chronic pain, osteoarthritis, osteoporosis, muscle weakness, muscle wasting, birth defects, periodontal disease, and more.

Vitamin D’s influence on key biological functions vital to one’s health and well-being mandates that vitamin D no longer be ignored by the health care industry nor by individuals striving to achieve and maintain a greater state of health.

If well adults and adolescents regularly avoid sunlight exposure, researchindicates a necessity to supplement with at least 5,000 units (IU) of vitamin D daily. To obtain this amount from milk one would need to consume 50 glasses. With a multivitamin more than 10 tablets would be necessary. Neither is advisable.
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The Vegetarian Myth – Lierre Keith –

The Human Template – we are hunting omnivores – not gorillas – Here Keith, an ex vegan, offers up a tour de force interview where she offers us the deep context for aligning what we eat to who we are.

Loren Cordain tells the story of what made us human

This is the first of a very helpful series by Loren Cordain that shows the link between diet and humanity

The Big Picture – don’t Eat Industrial Food

 

From Hunter Gatherer

We have been shaped by Evolution to fit an environment – the more we shape our diet, our view of where we fit socially and our fit with nature and our nature – the healthier we will be – by Design!

A key point though is that theses environmental forces take a long time. We cannot adapt well to total novelty as we find in modern food.

ADHD – Look at Diet!

April 18, 2011 Diet/Insulin 2 Comments

Over 5 million children ages four to 17 have been diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in the United States, and close to 3 million of those children take medication for their symptoms, according to the Centers for Disease Control. But a new study reported in The Lancet last month found that with a restricted diet alone, many children experienced a significant reduction in symptoms. The study’s lead author, Dr. Lidy Pelsser of the ADHD Research Center in the Netherlands, said in an interviewwith NPR, “The teachers thought it was so strange that the diet would change the behavior of the child as thoroughly as they saw it. It was a miracle, the teachers said.”

Dr. Pessler’s study is the first to conclusively say that diet is implicated in ADHD. In the NPR interview, Dr. Pessler did not mince words, “Food is the main cause of ADHD,” she said adding, “After the diet, they were just normal children with normal behavior. They were no longer more easily distracted, they were no more forgetful, there were no more temper-tantrums.” The study found that in 64 percent of children with ADHD, the symptoms were caused by food. “It’s a hypersensitivity reaction to food,” Pessler said.

This is good news for parents and children who would like to avoid many of the adverse side effects associated with common stimulant drugs, like Ritalin, used to treat ADHD — and bad news for the pharmaceutical industry. The National Institute of Mental Health reports that common side effects from the drugs are sleeplessness (for which a doctor might also prescribe sleeping pills), headaches, stomachaches, decreased appetite, and a long list of much more frightening (yet rarer) side effects, including feeling helpless, hopeless, or worthless, and new or worsening depression. But Pessler’s study indicates that up to two-thirds — or 2 of the 3 million children currently medicated for ADHD — may not need medication at all. “With all children, we should start with diet research,” Pessler said.

The Science Behind the Diet – Staffan Lindeberg – Food & Western Disease

Every week there is a new announcement from the science world about whether this or that is good or bad for us.  No wonder we are confused. Dr Lindeberg is different in that he:

  1. Operates from the highest context possible – that we are shaped by evolution
  2. Has done critical research in the field himself
  3. Has read EVERYTHING and on diet that there is
  4. Has put all of this together in one book that while being a science book, and expensive, is very accessible to the interested reader

I think that there are 2 key books in the Diet Evolutionary arena – this is the foundation and Gary Taubes’s Good Calories Bad Calories is the floor. Both deal head on with the Conventional Wisdom that fat makes us fat and that grains are good for us.

 
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Sugar – The hardest/best thing to give up

Sugar and its relative High Fructose Corn Syrup is everywhere today. 100 years ago, it was so expensive that only the rich  could afford it. Now it is the essential ingredient in nearly all processed foods. I have found that Robert Lustig is the best resource when it comes to explaining its effect on us. Here above the fold is a quick 10 minute summary of his thoughts – intercut are spokes people from the Corn Association who obviously have a point of view to defend.  After the fold I add Lustig’s key post Sugar the Bitter Truth – a 1 1/2 hour lecture that, for me went by in a flash. A compelling case and a compelling structure for how to tell a complex story well.

If you do nothing but take Lustig’s message to heart – you will have made great progress.

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Our Modern Diseases – Inevitable or Caused by Diet?

Gary Taubes is one of the best resources for exploring the science behind the ideas that are implicit in this site. He is a science writer who has reviewed the lexicon and has offered much clarity on the pathways to obesity and modern illness. His key book is Good Calories Bad Calories. Here is a review that will give you a sense of the case he makes.

“This is, hands down, one of the best and most important books ever written about nutrition. Gary Taubes is skeptical and inquiring. He does not settle for mainstream answers, and he has a knack for detecting crap ‘science’ and debunking it in a no holds barred way. The amount of research and investigation he has done for this book is staggering, so only pick up this book if you are interested in learning the truth about the history and motivations of modern American nutritionism. If you want to remain naïve and have your traditional nutrition beliefs confirmed, skip this book and go read Understanding Nutrition, 12th Edition by Eleanor Noss Whitney and Sharon Rady Rolfes.

The book is organized into three parts. Part one chronicles the beginnings and development of the fat-cholesterol hypothesis, which says that dietary fat (mainly saturated fat) is responsible for today’s nutritional diseases (e.g. obesity, diabetes, heart disease), that fat increases cholesterol, and that consistently elevated cholesterol levels lead to heart disease. The traditional argument is that a high-fat diet needs to be replaced with a high-carboyhydrate diet, based on whole grains, vegetables, and fruits, a diet that will ensure health, vitality, and long life. Taubes demonstrates the unquestionably political motivations of this new paradigm and how politics ended up trumping science in order to establish this new dogma.

Part two outlines a second approach to the question of modern nutritional diseases: the carbohydrate hypothesis. Taubes details how, prior to the 20th century, most people ate diets higher in fat and protein and lower in carbohydrates, and how they understood that one should consume more carbohydrates if he or she wanted to gain weight. This knowledge was simply common sense to people. He reveals the rare occurrence of modern nutritional diseases among populations that consume a low-carbohydrate diet. Morever, Taubes explains, scientifically, the effect carbohydrates have on insulin, triglycerides, cholesterol, and diabetes. He even proposes that the high-carb diet may be implicated in the etiology of dementia (and other brain diseases) and cancer.

Part three addresses obesity and weight regulation. Taubes argues that, contrary to prevailing opinion, it is not excess calories and a sedentary lifestyle that lead to overweightness and obesity. Instead, it is the quality of the calories – their macronutrient origin – that is crucial. He says that the typical recommendation to lose weight – eat less and exercise more – is basically intellectual nonsense: the less we eat, the lower our metabolic rate, and the less fat we metabolize; the more we exercise, the hungrier we get, and the more we eat. The diet advocated by the FDA, USDA, NAS, and myriads of other ‘professional’ organizations actually leads to a semi-starvation lifestyle, where people are constantly hungry. He illustrates how carbohydrates affect fat metabolism, insulin production, and hunger/satiety.

As one Amazon reviewer noted, the nutritional establishment has not offered any serious or substantial rebuttal to this book. Instead, the establishment does what it always does: it tells people to avoid ‘pseudo-science’ and to trust the ‘experts’ – i.e. the FDA, USDA, NAS, et. al. The people who will probably find this book the most annoying are the sports nutritionists and exercise physiologists, because it flies in the face of their multi-billion dollar industry. In fact, just last night at work I was talking with a colleague who is an exercise science major in college, and he was complaining about gaining weight, so I told him to go the low-carb route. He said that I was wrong, that we need a significant amount of carbohydrates to stay healthy – especially athletes – and that I was uninformed about this subject. I just chuckled and walked away.

Nevertheless, the people who will probably find this book the most troubling are average Americans who struggle with food, weight, and all the pressures surrounding this subject. On the one hand, they know that the traditional approach to losing weight – counting calories, cutting fat, bulking up the carbs, daily exercise, facing hunger – is cumbersome, bland, and, if they were to tell the truth, ineffective. The modern method of eating has taken the joy, simplicity, and naturalness out of eating. The result is that people are obsessed with food, weight, and image, they do not know where to turn, and many people (at one time, even myself) become depressed and helpless over the current food situation. On the other hand, Americans are wary of books such as Taubes’ because they hear the denunciations of the FDA, they know there are charlatans out there peddling fad diets that are unsafe yet beckon our trust, and they are not sure who or what to believe. Because most Americans do not have the knowledge to sift through these kinds of issues and receive no help from their primary care physicians (who have also bought into American nutritionism), this book could actually do them harm. Taubes’ vision of healthy eating can only become a reality when those in-the-know take time, skill, and compassion to help others know what the real deal is, why it is so, and how to put these principles into daily practice for life.”

In this short video he makes the case for how it is the modern diet that has caused the modern diseases – that include heart disease, cancer and even Alzheimers. For they are unknown in any society that does not share our diet.

Then after the fold I have posted the first part of a 7 part video where Taubes uses a lecture – with excellent slides – to take us through his main thesis.
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Your Ideal Diet – A great resource

Here is the best site I have found so far that talks in depth about the ideal diet and the science behind it all.

It opens like this –

This article is geared towards people who want to try out the Paleo diet and who just want to quickly know what they should and shouldn’t do.

No background science here or lengthy explanations, only 15 easy rules to follow to kick start your Paleo journey. It’s up to you to decide to what extend you want to follow those rules, but if you follow them 100% you can be assured that you are eating the best food for your body and greatly investing in your long term health and well-being.

 

 

The Missing Human Manual – Our Purpose

I have learned something new that I did not know before. We can prevent the modern illnesses such as heart disease, cancer, strokes, type 2 diabetes and dementia. I used to think that these were Normal. That it was my and your destiny to get them as we aged. I now know that this assumption is incorrect.

Normal means “Inevitable” or “Destiny”. For these diseases to be that kind of Normal, they would have to be part of our evolved biology. If they are not that, then they can be prevented. For if they are not part of our evolutionary design, then they can only be a product of how we live. We can do something about how we live. Let me show you what I mean.

It was “Normal” to die of cholera in London in 1850 or of Yellow Fever in Panama in 1900. It was “Normal” for many women to die of infection after giving birth in hospital until 1900. Your family would not think it was Normal for you to catch Cholera in London today. If your wife died of infection after giving birth, you would sue! To die of an infection in not Normal now. But we do think it is Normal to suffer and die from heart disease, cancer, strokes and dementia.

So the question of our time is can we repeat the same kind of breakthrough in science that we did in the 1880’s?

This is what this site is all about.  I am inviting you to become part of the great revolution in health. Where you will be able to take control of your own health. Where you can chose to have a long and vital old age.

Please come with me and find out why I am this excited.

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Cooking Made Us Human

Many people imagine early man eating raw food. Have you tried eating raw steak? It’s hard. Have you tried eating raw tubers? Professor Richard Wrangham makes a strong evolutionary case for Cooking as a key shaping factor in our evolution.

You are designed to stay fit


Georgina easter

This is Georgina Easter – she is 100 years old and here she is at her fitness class. She is unusual! But actually she is more “normal” than I had thought. We are designed to be like her and not like my mum.
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How did we get here – A Food Crisis

Why did we stop hunting and gathering and what has our choice of a new food system mean to us – James Burke sums it all up in this brilliant segment from his series Connections.

It’s our nature to be healthy as we age


This is me – a year ago. A “normal” overweight 59 year old male. 205 lbs and 5.11″ My BMI is 28.6 or just under Obese at 30.

I am 60 years old. Life expectancy for a man of my time and age on PEI is 75. On Average by 65 the average of men like me will be helpless.

Is this  my destiny? Is it yours?

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  • Emma Johnson: Needed this to lighten the mood at the end of the day. Give...
  • RJ Jamieson: The mammary tissue was consumed repleat with raw milk drippi...
  • Anonymous: Your claim about wild fruit isn't 100% true. Read this artic...
  • Art: Staffan has recently passed away. We shall all miss him. Jan...
  • Jackie: This sounds great. But I was hoping that this article might ...
  • Phantom The God: Don't forget Coke damages your teeth and make your bones bri...
  • moon: Wow so many veganazis here... there was a study on 2 men who...
  • Christian DiMaria: This article seems to be exclusively focusing on sugar and c...
  • john: nital your a nitwit plain and simple how you have deluded...
  • Dane: But doesn't fructose take longer to process, thus allowing m...
  • cody f: let me set this straight.... Different humans are programmed...
  • cpu: An eclectivore diet seems best, meaning, eating a varieti-vo...
  • Omnivore: (Reply to monster221) Not all of us lived on costal beaches....
  • Omnivore: let me sum it up. Search "man eats meat for five years. Look...
  • marisa: Larch tree arabinogalactan is a natural fiber that does not ...

What is the Missing Human Manual All About?

Do you want to age well? Most of us do. If you are my age, 60, this is more important a question that if you are 30. But most of us would not wish to have heart disease, cancer, dementia when we get old.

Most of us think it is normal that we will get ill like this.

But science today tells us that this is not "Normal". Our evolutionary past designed us to be active and fit until we drop dead. Why? Because raising human children takes so long. Mature adults had to do most of the hard work enable us to invest up to 25 years in our kids.

We are designed by our evolution to reach a plateau of fitness in mid life. So why do most of us not live like this?

We don't because, we have strayed away from the best way of living that fits our evolution best. Our culture has got too far ahead of our biology. We eat foods that make us ill. We have lost our social identity and power and that makes us ill. And we have lost touch with the circadian rhythms of the Natural World, and that has made us ill too.

We have lost our fit with our true nature.

This site will be a Manual. It will show you what the best fit is. It will show you the science behind this. It will share with you some methods for getting your fit back with your true human nature.

So welcome to the "Missing Human Manual" . I hope that we can help you and I hope that you can help others as a result.

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